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About Halal & The Global Market

Global Halal Market trends

The global halal industry is estimated to be worth around USD2.3 trillion (excluding Islamic finance). Growing at an estimated annual rate of 20%, the industry is valued at about USD560 billion a year. Thus, making it one of the fastest growing consumer segments in the world. The global halal market of 1.8 billion Muslims is no longer confined to food and food related products. The halal industry has now expanded beyond the food sector to include pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, health products, toiletries and medical devices as well as service sector components such as logistics, marketing, print and electronic media, packaging, branding, and financing. In recent years, with the increase in the number of affluent Muslims, the halal industry has expanded further into lifestyle offerings including halal travel and hospitality services as well as fashion.

 

The halal market is non-exclusive to Muslims, and has gained increasing acceptance among non-Muslim consumers who associate halal with ethical consumerism. The popularity of, and demand for, halal certified products among non-Muslim consumers have been on the rise as more consumers are looking for high quality, safe and ethical products. No longer a mere religious obligation or observance for Muslims, halal (which means “lawful” or “allowable”) has become a powerful market force, becoming increasingly a world-wide market phenomenon for both Muslims and non-Muslims alike.

 

What is Halal?

HALAL = HEALTHY, WHOLESOME & HYGIENE

Halal is an Arabic word simply means permissible or lawful. Means any foods that are allowed to be consumed according to Islamic Sharia law.

This means that for any food to be considered halal it must comply with the religious ritual and observance of Sharia law.

What is Haram?

The opposite of halal is haram (forbidden).

Food can be forbidden in Islam if it includes:

  • blood
  • alcohol
  • meat or any products from a forbidden animal, including pigs and any carnivorous animals or birds of prey
  • meat or any products of an animal which has not been slaughtered in the correct manner in the name of Allah

Under Islamic law (sharia) it is permissible (halal) to consume items that would otherwise be termed haram so long as it is a matter of survival and not just an act of disobedience.